Caravaggio: Saint Matthew and the Angel, 1602, Oil on

Caravaggio: Saint Matthew and the Angel, 1602, Oil on

5/10/2021, 4:01:42 PM
Caravaggio: Saint Matthew and the Angel, 1602, Oil on canvas, 295 cm × 195 cm (116 in × 77 in), Destroyed #Caravaggio #Matthew #SaintMatthewandtheAngel #Art #Paintings #Painters #Arthistory #Italian #pittore #pittura #pintor #pintura #peintre #peinture #Arte #artista #artwork #Maler #Malerei #oilpainting #artgallery #masterpiece #masters #ItalianArt Saint Matthew and the Angel is a painting from Caravaggio, completed for the Contarelli Chapel in the church of San Luigi dei Francesi in Rome. It was destroyed during World War II bombing, while housed in the Kaiser Friedrich Museum in Berlin. This work, as a pillar of the Baroque movement, might have provided new information about the artist and patron. Today it is known only from black-and-white photographs and enhanced color reproductions. In the painting the angel stands close to Matthew the Evangelist and engages in what appears more direct intervention than divine inspiration. The angel intertwines with the old man, apparently whispering inspiration into his ear. Caravaggio was known in his time for realistic paintings, using models instead of standard convention and idealization. He made his figures lifelike and relatable, as opposed to portraying unrealistic or phony poses... And this image showed Saint Matthew as poorly groomed, with dirty feet. Although this was the style of Caravaggio, in this instance the church leaders thought it was too crude and did not want to have what looked like a peasant who looked as if just walked in off the street hanging in their sacred altarpiece. The patrons wanted an idealization of the beloved Saint, someone who its viewers could admire and strain to be like. Therefore it was rejected and replaced with a new version of the same subject matter.

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