In The Angel of Death (1880), Evelyn De Morgan expresses

In The Angel of Death (1880), Evelyn De Morgan expresses

3/1/2021, 12:25:38 PM
In The Angel of Death (1880), Evelyn De Morgan expresses that death does not have to be scary. De Morgan believed that one should not fear death and welcome it instead, which is reflected in this painting. While the angel looks young in the face, we can recognize the gray hair, scythe, and wings identifying it as the angel of death. She has gently approached the frail woman in red to tell that her time has come. And if you look at the landscape behind the woman (left side of the painting), it looks dry and we can identify a thistle in the left foreground. This indicates that the woman has had a rough life. But the way ahead, where the angel will take her (right side of the painting) looks much better with spring flowers and a healthy landscape. Evelyn De Morgan (1855-1919) was a prolific artist, part of the Late Pre-Raphaelite style. She was married to the ceramic artist William De Morgan, and got inspiration for her work from the art by both Sandro Botticelli and her contemporary Pre-Raphaelite colleague Edward Burne-Jones. #Art #Painting #Artwork #ArtHistory #HistoryofArt #OilPainting #OilonCanvas #BritishArt #BritishArtist #BritishPainter #FemalePainter #FemaleArtist #EvelyndeMorgen #DeMorgen #PreRaphaelite #PreRaphaelites #PreRaphaeliteBrotherhood #Angel #AngelofDeath #Spiritual #Spiritualism

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