The Nightmare, by Henry Fuseli.⁠ 🎨The quintaessence of

The Nightmare, by Henry Fuseli.⁠ 🎨The quintaessence of

7/27/2021, 7:01:51 PM
The Nightmare, by Henry Fuseli.⁠ 🎨The quintaessence of Romanticism is brought to canvas as a young woman laying in bed, threatened by the demon of a nightmare. The sitter is no other than Anna Landolt, the artist’s lover and niece of the Zurich physiologist Johann Caspar Lavater. Lavater and Fuseli were close friends, but Fuseli’s suit was rejected by Anna’s parents. This iconic canvas may be interpreted as an allegory of disappointment, as a portrait of Anna is actually painted on the reverse. ⁠ 👨‍🎨Johann Heinrich Füssli (Swish, 1741-1825) was a Romantic artist and jack of all trades. His one-of-a-kind style has received plenty of different labels, such as neoclassical, neomannerist and preromantic. He reunites currents from English and Nordic painting, reflecting the philosophical advances of the time such as the notion of “sublime” (artistic tension between aesthetic beauty and deadly dramatism) and existentialism. During his stay in Italy he matured his style and adquired his theatrical, anti-academic character. The shapes of his figures depart from the rules of anatomy lessons and give rise to new fantastic and sensual creatures. Despite his establishment in England, Füssli is a German-style Romantic, exploring terrifying nocturnal and irrational worlds. Although shortly after after his death his work fell into relative oblivion, his figure was vindicated by the expressionists and surrealists, who considered him a predecessor.⁠ 📐Height: 101.6 cm (40 in); Width: 127 cm (50 in). Oil on canvas, 1781.⁠ 🏛Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit. ⁠ @diadetroit What do you think about this? ⁠ Share and follow @monteroneart for a daily 🎨!

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