In Time of Peril, by Leighton.⁠ 🎨 A mysterious yet

In Time of Peril, by Leighton.⁠ 🎨 A mysterious yet

7/17/2021, 12:31:59 PM
In Time of Peril, by Leighton.⁠ 🎨 A mysterious yet worldwide admired painting of unclear significance. The subject does not appear to represent any specific historical subject, but an invented incident from the Middle Ages where a young boy and a baby are in flight with their mother, a soldier or father, and chests and bundles of treasures, and arrive at some sort of church. As the adults in the boat await anxiously for permission to enter the sanctuary, the young prince looks over his shoulder and the potential lurking danger. For some, as this canvas was created and exhibited during Queen Victoria’s sixtieth anniversary of reign and represented the anxieties stirred by an aging monarch. Personally, it reminds me of the moment in Victor Hugo’s Notre Dame de Paris when Esmeralda stealthily enters the city escorted by other gypsies, hiding baby Quasimodo and runs before Claude Frollo can arrest her.⁠ 👨‍🎨 Edmund Blair Leighton (British, 1852-1922) was a painter of historical genre scenes, specializing in Recengy and medieval subjects and member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, the English Romantic school of painting that believed the classical poses and compositions (paramounted by Raphael) were a corrupting influence on creativity. Hence, religious, mythological or literary themes are abundant among these painters' artwork. They were harshly criticized by Sir Joshua Reynolds and affiliated with the renowned critic John Rushkin, both key influential figures over the late Romantic Era. Leighton was born to a family of artists and received a privileged training at the Royal Academy, soon celebrated for his photographic level of detail and Greek inspiration for figures. Although his work is often cryptic in their interpretation, Edmund encapsulates with his themes the epitome of medieval iconography.⁠ 📐Height: 124 cm (49 in). Width: 168 cm (66.5 in). Oil on canvas, around 1897.⁠ 🏛Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand.⁠ @aucklandartgallery What do you think about this? ⁠ Share and follow @monteroneart for a daily 🎨!

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