Portrait of Félix Fénéon, by Paul Signac. 🎨 A psychedelic

Portrait of Félix Fénéon, by Paul Signac. 🎨 A psychedelic

7/23/2021, 5:02:12 AM
Portrait of Félix Fénéon, by Paul Signac. 🎨 A psychedelic and fascinating portrait of a similar sitter. Félix Fénéon was an editor, translator, art deale and anarchist activist, and the critic who coined the term Neo-Impressionism to describe the works of Signac and Seurat in the late 1880s. Attention to abstract patterns continues in the kaleidoscopic pinwheel of the backdrop, likely an allusion to the aesthetic theory of Charles Henry, the Frenchman whose books on color theory and the “algebra” of visual rhythm Signac had recently illustrated. Fénéon’s relation to the decorative background may be symbolic. In 1887 he had defended the Neo-Impressionists against criticism that their application of paint in uniform dots resembled mosaics or tapestries. “Take a few steps back,” Fénéon urged, and “the technique . . . vanishes; the eye is no longer attracted by anything but that which is essentially painting.” As Fénéon saw it, painting was the creation of a superior and purified reality transfused with the artist’s personality. 👨‍🎨 Paul Signac (French, 1863-1935) was a Neo-Impressionist painter famous for his development of the technique of pointillism. Born to a wealthy family, he enjoyed enough freedom to pursue an artistic career. He is one of the main representatives of the liberation of color with respect to the object. Signac took lessons, in the early 1880s, with the artist Emile Bin, who at the time was the mayor of Montmartre. At first he was influenced by Monet, Pissarro and Renoir, but after the founding of the Salon des Indépendants in Paris he became a Neo-Impressionist when he met Seurat in 1884, his lifelong colleague of artistic thought. The theme of his work focuses, for the most part, on bourgeoise life and the landscape of the ports, mostly on his ship Olympia, named after the Manet's masterpiece. 📐 Height: 73.5 cm (29 in). Width: 92.5 cm (36.5 in). Oil on canvas, 1890. 🏛 Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art, New York. @metmuseum What do you think about this? Share and follow @monteroneart for a daily 🎨!

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