Las Meninas, by Diego Velázquez.⁠ 🎨One of the most complex

Las Meninas, by Diego Velázquez.⁠ 🎨One of the most complex

8/16/2021, 7:01:52 PM
Las Meninas, by Diego Velázquez.⁠ 🎨One of the most complex and fascinating paintings in all history of art and the masterpiece of the Spanish master. A court scene around the infant Margarita, who is attended by two of the Queen’s meninas or maids-of honour, as well the artist himself. The figures inhabit a space that is modelled not just through the laws of scientific perspective but also through aerial perspective. In the definition of this space the multiplication of the light sources plays an important role.⁠ 👨‍🎨Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (Spanish, 1599-1660) was a Baroque painter and the most renowned Spanish artist. Born in Seville, and although his early paintings were religious, he soon was noticed for his realistic and complex portraits. Trained during his youth under his patron Francisco Pacheco, who later also became his father-in-law, he was influenced by Caravaggio. He moved to Madrid in 1622, where he earned the chance to paint a portrait of the powerful Count-Duke of Olivares, who recommended Velázquez to King Philip IV. Velázquez was appointed court painter and earned access to a wealth of resources and connections such as Peter Paul Rubens. He produced remarkable mythological canvases during this time. His first trip to Italy in 1629 lasted two years, and inspired him to paint a series of portraits that featured members of the royal family and his dwarves. He also took other roles in court other than painter. He made a second trip to Italy in 1649, also for two years, and produced several masterpieces such as his portrait of Pope Innocent X. Velázquez returned to his portraiture after rejoining the Madrid court, his technique more assured than ever. In 1656, he produced perhaps his most acclaimed work Las Meninas, for many the Bible of painting. Two years later he was named Knight of Santiago, a distinction he proudly added to his masterpiece.⁠ 📐Height: 320.5 cm (126 in). Width: 281.5 cm (110.8 in). Oil on canvas, 1656.⁠ 🏛Museo del Prado, Madrid.⁠ @museoprado What do you think about this? ⁠ Share and follow @monteroneart for a daily 🎨!⁠ Shop your art in the Link in Bio.

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